Non-Malignant Leukocyte Disorders

Non-Malignant simply means that it is localized to the leukocytes. Leukocytes are another name for the white blood cells, more specifically in the case of these disorders, the granulocytes. These disorders are fairly uncommon and are inherited. The following are ones that are found to distinct morphological features and affect the granulocyte functionality.

Alder Reilly Anomaly

Alder Reilly Anomaly is a recessive trait defect that causes incomplete degranulation of mucopolysaccharides. Large, darkly staining metachromatic cytoplasmic granules which can be seen and are partially digested mucopolysaccharides. These granules are characteristically referred to as Alder Reilly bodies. These can sometimes resemble toxic granulation, but it is important to note that in toxic granulation neutropenia, dohle bodies, and a left shift is seen. In Alder Reilly Anomaly none of those are present. Its also important to mention that the functionality of the granulocytes is not impaired.

Alder Reilly

Pelger Huet Anomaly

Pelger Huet Anomaly is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by decreased nuclear segmentation. This is caused by a mutation in the Lamin B receptor gene. Lamin B is an inner nuclear membrane protein that plays a role in normal leukocyte nuclear shape change during maturation. Morphological changes include hyposegmented neutrophils or neutrophil lobes connected by a thin nuclear filament. Pseudo or acquired PHA can be observed in the granulocytes in individuals with MDS, AML, or chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pelger Huet

Chediak Higashi Syndrome

Chediak Higashi Syndrome is characterized by an abnormal fusion of granules. These present as large and are dysfunctional. This is caused by a mutation in the LYST, or CHS1 gene that encodes for proteins involved in vesicle fusion or fission. The mutated protein causes loss of lysosomal movement and loss of phagocytosis. Thus leaving the individual susceptible to an increased number of infections without the innate immune system to fight them off. One of the characteristic findings is neutropenia.

CHA

May-Hegglin Anomaly

May-Hegglin Anomaly is a rare autosomal dominant platelet disorder that is characterized by variable thrombocytopenia, giant platelets, and dohle bodie like inclusions in the granulocytes. MHA is caused by a mutation in the MYH9 gene that causes a dysfunctional and disarray production of myosin heavy chains type IIa which affects the megakaryocytic maturation process as well as platelet fragmentation. Though most cases are clinically asymptomatic, the individual may present with mild bleeding tendencies.

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Chronic Granulomatous Disease

In CGD, mutations in proteins that make up the NADPH oxidase complex. The mutations lead to failure of the phagocytes to generate the oxygen-dependent respiratory burst following phagocytosis. Normal phagocytosis of a microorganism leads to phosphorylation of cytosolic P47 and P67. Antibacterial neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G from the primary granules and cytochrome complex gp91 and gp22 from the secondary granules migrate to the phagolysosome. NADPH oxidase is formed when P47 and P67 combine with P40, RAC2, and the cytochrome complex. Majority of cases of CGD is due to mutations in P47 or gp91.

Leukocyte Adhesion Disorders

Normal recruitment of leukocytes to a site of inflammation involves capture of leukocytes from peripheral blood, followed by a process known as rolling along a vessel wall. Rolling involves binding of integrins to endothelial cell receptors which is high-affinity which ultimately leads to diapedesis of leukocytes into tissues from peripheral blood. With Leukocyte Adhesion disorders there are mutations that result in the inability of neutrophils and monocytes to adhere to endothelial cells, and the consequence is potentially fatal bacterial infections.

Leukocyte Adhesion Disorder I is caused by a mutation in the genes responsible for B2 integrin subunits. This leads to a decreased amount of the truncated form of the B2 integrin which is essential for endothelial cell adhesion. Patients typically present with neutrophilia, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and characteristic skin lesions.

Leukocyte Adhesion Disorder II is caused by a mutation in the SLC35C1 gene. This gene encodes for a fucose transporter that moves fucose from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi region. Fucose is needed for the synthesis of selectin ligands. The defective fucose transporter leads to the inability to produce functional selectins and causes defective leukocyte recruitment and reoccurring infections. LADII is much more rare than LADI. Clinical presentation is growth retardation, coarse facial features, and other physical deformities.

Leukocyte Adhesion Disorder III is even more rare than LADII and is caused by a mutation in the Kindlin-3 gene. The mutations impair leukocyte rolling and activation of B integrin. With LADIII there is also decreased platelet integrin GPIIbIIIa resulting in bleeding similar to that of Glanzmann Thrombasthenia.

-Caleb

2 thoughts on “Non-Malignant Leukocyte Disorders

    1. Thank you. I try to put things in terms that most people can understand while still trying to get at the main point.

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