Aspirin as a blood thinner?

Most people who have had previous cardiac issues, those who have even had a minor heart attack or survived a major infarction have often been prescribed to take an aspirin daily. To tackle this issue, its important to understand what a heart attack or an infarction actually is. Usually blood travels to the lungs, it gets oxygenated, and then travels through the coronary arteries to oxygenate the heart muscle itself. People over time can develop plagues that thin the artery lumen, or opening, eventually to the point where only a small amount of oxygenated blood can actually pass through. As a result, the heart can’t keep itself oxygenated. Without oxygen, tissues become hypoxic and die. When they die they release toxic cytokines and chemicals that damage tissue further, which coincidently we can objectively measure to determine whether an individual has experienced a heart attack. Heart attacks can come from a deep vein thrombosis, or an emboli as well. In that scenario, the clot actually happens somewhere else in the body and a piece of it breaks off and circulates until it gets to the heart and blocks the blood flow in the heart, causing an infarct.

Aspirin works as a blood thinner. It impairs the bodies ability to form a clot. What is a clot formed out of? Platelets. So aspirin directly targets a precursor to thromboxane A2, which activates downstream signaling to aggregate platelets and form a clot in primary hemostasis.

Synthesis of TXA2

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The synthesis of thromboxane A2 is through the Arachidonic Acid, Cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Phospholipids are converted to Arachidonic Acid catalyzed by phospholipase C or phospholipase A2. Arachidonic acid can at that point go to two pathways; the Lipooxygenase pathway, or the Cyclooxygenase pathway. There are two Cyclooxygenase peroxidase; COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 mediates the pathway through which thromboxane A2 is going to be synthesized, and COX-2 mediates another pathway that works to synthesize prostaglandins which directly counteract the function of thromboxane A2. Its the bodies way of keeping homeostasis. For every action, there has to be an equal reaction. In the next step in the pathway, Arachidonic Acid is converted to Prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) by PGH2 synthase and COX-1/COX-2 working synergistically. Prostaglandin H2 is then converted to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) by thromboxane synthase. TXA2 is a vasoconstrictor and potent hypertensive agent.

So, how does aspirin come into play at all? Good thing you asked. Aspirin as it turns out irreversibly binds to COX-1. This antagonist effect stops the pathway and does not allow for the synthesis of thromboxane A2. Without TXA2, there will be no platelet aggregation, and no clot. Without primary hemostasis being established, coagulation, or secondary hemostasis, can’t take over to stabilize the clot with fibrin.

 

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